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By Marge Gianopoulos, Sept. 5, 2018 –

According to the Pew Research Center, 95 percent of teens currently report they have a smartphone or access to one; 45 percent say they are online “almost constantly.”

Since the advent of MySpace (Does anyone even remember that one?) and then Facebook, social media has become the primary way for teens to connect with their peers, friends and family.

In a 2014 Pew survey, 24 percent of teens stated they are online “almost constantly.”  In just four years the percent of teens using social media “constantly” has almost doubled.

Social media has been infused in our teens’ lives and apparently it’s here to stay.  Several years ago the Evansville-Vanderburgh School Corporation started using tablets, and this year Warrick County high school students began using them as well.  Between the use of smartphones, computers, tablets, and gaming systems, how much screen time is considered healthy?

On Monday, September 10th, from 5:30–7:30 pm, Indiana Youth Institute, Youth First, Inc., Warrick County Cares, and Warrick County School Corporation will provide some insight for parents, youth workers and other adults who want to know how social media and screen time are impacting our teens.

Dennis Jon Bailey, WIKY Morning Show DJ, will conduct a panel discussion on the pros, cons and effects of social media and screen time.  The panel is made up of area professionals who have contact with youth and see firsthand how social media is affecting teens’ health (physical and mental) and academics.

The panel includes Warrick County School Administrators Ashlee Bruggenschmidt, Abbie Redman and Josh Susott; Warrick County Sheriff Deputy and School Resource Officer Mike Dietsch; Youth First Director of Social Work Laura Keys; Youth First School Social Worker Terra Clark; Warrick County Deputy Prosecutor Parker Trulock; and Vice President of the Psychology Program at Evansville Easterseals Rehabilitation Center, Dr. James Schroeder.

As a Pediatric Psychologist, Dr. Schroeder has conducted extensive research on screen time and the impact of social media on our youth and often writes for the Evansville Courier.  You can access his articles at http://james-schroeder.com.

In addition to the panel discussion, the real experts, local teens, will be available to show adults how to navigate the most popular social media apps such as SnapChat, Instagram, and Musical.ly.  Each of these apps will have a table where adults can learn from the teens. Teens will share the ins-and-outs of the app, explain privacy settings and demonstrate how adults can keep children and teens safe while online.

Youth in a Digital World: Pros, Cons and Effects of Social Media, will take place from 5:30-7:30 pm on September 10th at the Newburgh Chandler Public Libraries, 4111 Lakeshore Dr., Newburgh, and light snacks will be served.  Registration is required, as space is limited.   Register at https://warrickcoywc091018.eventbrite.com.

By Youth First Staff – July 17, 2018 –

Bullying is not a new problem. Children, parents, teachers, and other school staff have always dealt with incidents on the playground or name-calling on the bus, but these days bullying no longer ends with the school day.

Technology provides many positive benefits in our personal lives and educational system. Cyberbullying, however, is one negative outgrowth of 24/7 connectivity.

The term cyberbullying is defined by the Merriam-Webster Dictionary as “the electronic posting of mean-spirited messages about a person, often done anonymously.”

With social networking sites such as Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and Twitter and the ability to share photos and videos via social media and text, it’s almost impossible to keep up with the rapid growth of cyberbullying.

According to the DoSomething.org, at least 43% of American teens have been bullied online, and 1 in 4 has had it happen more than once.  Seventy percent of students report seeing frequent bullying online. Girls are about twice as likely as boys to be victims and perpetrators of cyberbullying.

Victims of cyberbullying experience low self-esteem, increased use of drugs or alcohol, poor academic achievement, and anxiety or an unwillingness to attend school (stopcyberbullying.gov).

Because these acts do not typically happen on school grounds, it can be difficult for schools to intervene.  Parents must play a key role in educating children about acceptable uses of technology and what to do if they encounter cyberbullying.

Start by being involved in your child’s online life.  Know passwords, “friend” or “follow” them on social media sites, and look at websites your child frequents.

Educate children on how to use the internet safely and establish firm consequences if they abuse technological privileges.  Encourage children to protect passwords and avoid sharing them with peers (not even their best friends) or in public places. Make sure they don’t post any personal information on the internet such as a phone number, address, or even their favorite place to socialize.

Due to the fear of losing access to technology, only 1 in 10 students report telling their parents when they have been cyberbullied. It is important for children to feel comfortable coming to parents with this type of information.

Start by educating kids on what they should do if they encounter cyberbullying.  The website stopcyberbullying.org promotes the “stop, block, and tell” strategy.  Parents can easily share the following steps with their children:

1. Stop: Immediately stop interacting with a peer who is cyberbullying.  Encourage them to not respond to the peer in any way.

2. Block: Block the cyberbully from continuing to communicate.  Make sure children know how to block someone from their social networking sites or other technology.

3. Tell: As soon as they encounter a bully of any kind, children should tell their parents. Parents should remain calm, listen carefully, and involve the child in decisions about what to do next.

The next steps may be as simple as blocking a phone number or as involved as talking with your child’s school about the offense. Refrain from contacting the parents or guardians of the bully. They may become defensive and may not be receptive to your thoughts.

Sometimes just offering your child moral support is enough, but don’t hesitate to inform and involve others in order to put a stop to cyberbullying for good.